Australian Meat Processors Corporation

0
3981
Australian Meat Processors Corporation
Click to view in Digital Magazine
Australian Meat Processors Corporation
Click to view in Digital Magazine

Giving the Industry a Protein Injection

AMPC
Click to view Brochure

Major industries often need to consolidate mutual needs and services under one organisational body in order to focus these services. The meat industry is no exception to this rule and it is in this regard that the Australian Meat Processors Corporation caters to its clients’ research and development needs. The AMPC’s mission statement is to promote, protect and further the rights and mutual interests of its member companies. In more specific terms, the AMPC was developed to drive the investment of processor R&D and to efficiently channel Government research subsidies into programs and activities that support concurrent processor and meat industry priorities. They are a highly skilled and extremely proficient collective of industry minded specialists that serve as a go-to when members have specific intellectual demands or seemingly unsolvable problems.

The Australian Meat Processors Corporation was formed in 1998 as a result of the Australian Government’s overhaul of the red meat industry. It had been decided that government levies needed to be reduced and a producer company, as a pre-requisite, was required to interact with self-funded, legislated companies. That was when the AMPC, and many such industry bodies, was formed. While one of many at the time, each was tasked with a specific area. Some may have focused on legislation or advocacy, but process improvement and innovation, as well as marketing, was the AMPC’s specific focus. Since then, the AMPC has acquired 126 members, operating 154 meat processing establishments, which represents 96 per cent of Australia’s meat processing capacity. With the many logistical issues that could arise from such a large compendium of organisations, the AMPC has demonstrated an impressive level of control and efficiency in delivering services to clients.

What specifically are those services? To understand the specifics of the diverse facilities the AMPC provides to its members, one has to divide those services into categories. “We operate under two different programs,” says CEO Michelle Edge. “The first is namely our Core programs, which is essentially the bulk of our services. These are done through consultation with meat processors, and they are aimed at supporting activities aimed to deliver improvements to the processing sector of the meat and livestock supply and value chain.” The result of these improved processes can result in new ways of maximising production, product shelf life, et cetera. Processes such as these can increase production value on meat commodities, which can lead to benefits for both the industry and the Australian community. Another benefit is augmentation of overall ROI for processors and investors, also a priority for the AMPC. “We are always on the lookout for ways to improve the quality of the marketplace for the end users as well as the industry. A breakthrough in the Research and Development segment can achieve that level of impact; affect that sort of change,” Edge says.

The other category of the AMPC’s services is their Join programs. These services work on a larger, more macro-level than their Core programs do. The benefits here can impact the whole of the industry supply and value chain activities. Examples of this can be seen in food safety initiatives, nutritional value, as well as increasing market access and demand. While working under the Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA) body, the AMPC and Peak Councils work together to expand the direction and specific objections for the Australian meat industry. “When we co-ordinate with other organisations, it is important to identify annual operational targets so we can make the most efficient use of time and resources. We than use KPI’s (Key Performance Indicators) to accurately measure the progress of these initiatives and report this information to investors,” Edge explains. In the meat industry, as in any other, Join programs are funded by several mutually interested groups. The AMPC and MLA use levies acquired from both of their respective members – producer as well as processor – and Government Research and Development funds to execute these goals.

Through its association with the Australian Meat Industry Council (AMIC), the Australian Government, the MLA, other industry bodies, as well as its direct membership, the AMPC has a very demanding mission to perform. Through activities such as broad-based R&D, increasing industry-related awareness through communications, and partnering with other industry bodies to complete value projects, they have proven their competence. Their practices have saved important funds, increased meat safety, and increased production value for their members. These benefits also spill over into the public domain and boost end-user value. That they can effectively perform all of these mandates, and do so on a regular basis, is a daunting achievement indeed, and it is no wonder that 96 per cent of the country’s meat processing capacity relies them. “Ultimately we want to do our best to benefit our membership,” Edge says and continues, “Be it in the R&D segment or by identifying important strategic goals, we have all the right people and abilities in place to follow through with membership needs.” Judging by their consistent efforts and demonstrated results, it is not difficult to suggest the Australian Meat Processors Corporation will meet every challenge with competence and success.